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3 edition of The philosophie, commonlie called, the morals, written by ... Plutarch of Chæronea found in the catalog.

The philosophie, commonlie called, the morals, written by ... Plutarch of Chæronea

Plutarch

The philosophie, commonlie called, the morals, written by ... Plutarch of Chæronea

by Plutarch

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Published by A. Hatfield in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementTranslated ... into English ... by P. Holland, ....
ContributionsHatfield, Arnold, d. 1612?, printer., Holland, P.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17271695M

, Philemon Holland (translator), The Philosophie, commonlie called, the Morals written by the learned philosopher Plutarch of Chæronea, London, “The Education of Children,” p. 16, Commeth he in the morning to do his dutie and bid thee good morrow, belching sowre and smelling strongly of wine, which the day before he drunke at the. vii. PREFACE. Plutarch, who was born at Chæronea in Bœotia, probably about A.D. 50, and was a contemporary of Tacitus and Pliny, has written two works still extant, the well-known Lives, and the less-known Lives have often been translated, and have always been a popular work. Great indeed was their power at the period of the French Revolution.

PLUTARCH'S LIVES Dryden Edition. Revised and with an Introduction by Arthur Hugh Clough. In Three Volumes. Volume 1 (ONLY) by Plutarch and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Source: Introduction to Shakespeare’s Plutarch, ed. C.F. Tucker Brooke (New York: Duffield and Company, ). Vol. I containing the main sources of Julius Caesar. INTRODUCTION. The influence of the writings of Plutarch of Chæronea on English literature might well be made the subject of one of the most interesting chapters in the long story of the debt of moderns to ancients.

Josiah If I recall correctly from a comment a history prof said, Plutarch writes this book to provide a moral example to young men and boys. Alexander is dep more If I recall correctly from a comment a history prof said, Plutarch writes this book to provide a moral example to young men and boys. Alexander is depicted as exemplifying the cardinal virtues of the Greeks (courage, justice 4/5. Plutarch was born to a prominent family in the small town of Chaeronea, about 80 km (50 miles) east of Delphi, in the Greek region of family was wealthy. The name of Plutarch's father has not been preserved, but based on the common Greek custom of repeating a name in alternate generations, it was probably Nikarchus (Nίκαρχoς).The name of Plutarch's grandfather was Lamprias.


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The philosophie, commonlie called, the morals, written by ... Plutarch of Chæronea by Plutarch Download PDF EPUB FB2

The philosophie, commonlie called, the morals vvritten by the learned philosopher Plutarch of Chæronea. Translated out of Greeke into English, and conferred with the Latine translations and the French, by Philemon Holland of Coventrie, Doctor in Physicke.

VVhereunto are annexed the summaries necessary to be read before every treatise. THE PHILOSOPHIE, commonlie called, THE MORALS WRITTEN BY the learned Philosopher PLUTARCH of Chaeronea.

Translated out of Greeke into English, and conferred the morals the Latine translations and the French, by PHILEMON HOLLAND of Coventrie, Doctor in Physicke. Whereunto are annexed the Summaries necessary to be read before every Treatise.

“A PROFOUND INFLUENCE ON RENAISSANCE THINKING”: IMPORTANT FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH OF PLUTARCH’S MORALS. PLUTARCH. The Philosophie; commonlie called, The Morals Translated out of Greeke into English by Philemon Holland.

London: Arnold Hatfield, London: Arnold Hatfield, First English language edition. Folio pages x mm collating: 8,1 blank, 62; complete excepting for the final errata leaf. Bound in late 17th century full calf, rabacked with the spine laid down.

Marbled end papers front end paper detached but present. Each owner's ink signature on the title page, early marginialia throughout. OCLC Number: Language Note: Includes some terms and phrases in Greek or Latin. Notes: "To the most high and mighty Prince, Iames, by the grace of God, King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, defender of the faith, &c.": first sequence, unnumbered pages (leaves [par.]2-[par.]3 recto).

The Philosophy Commonly Called, the Morals Written by the Learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chaeronea. Translated Out of Greek Into English, and Conferred with the Latine Translations and the French, by Philemon Holland, Doctor of Physick. Whereunto Are Annexed the Summaries Necessary to Be Read Before Every Treatise.

The Moralia (Ancient Greek: Ἠθικά Ethika; loosely translated as "Morals" or "Matters relating to customs and mores") of written by. Plutarch of Chæronea book 1st-century Greek scholar Plutarch of Chaeronea is an eclectic collection of 78 essays and transcribed speeches.

They provide insights into Roman and Greek life, but often are also timeless observations in their own right. Many generations of Europeans have read or Author: Plutarch.

The Philosophie, Commonlie Called: The Morals Written by the Learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chaeronea, translated out of Greeke into English and conferred with the Latine translations and the French. London: Arnold Hatfield. Google ScholarCited by: 1. The Philosophie, commonlie called, the Morals.

Written by the learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chæronea. Translated out of Greeke into English, and conferred with the Latine translations and the French, by Philemon Holland of Conventrie, Doctor in Physicke.

Whereunto are annexed the Summaries necessary to be read before every Treatise. the latest, Philemon Holland published an English translation (The Philosophie commonlie called the Morals written by the learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chaeronea, translated out of Greeke into English by Philemon Holland of Coventrie, Doctor in Physicke at London by Arnold Hatfield, ).

Holland, The Philosophie, Commonlie called, the Morals sig. B4v. On the changing habits of book-buyers, see Alexandra Halasz, The Marketplace of Print: Pamphlets and the Public Sphere in Early Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ), pp.

1– David Cressy traces patterns of early modern literacy in Literacy and the Social Order: Reading and Writing in Tudor and Stuart Author: Katharine A. Craik.

Plutarch, who was born at Chæronea in Bœotia, probably about A.D. 50, and was a contemporary of Tacitus and Pliny, has written two works still extant, the well-known Lives, and the less-known Moralia.

The Lives have often been translated, and have always been a popular work. Great indeed was their power at the period of the French Revolution. The philosophie, commonlie called: the morals written by the learned philosopher Plutarch of Chaeronea: Pliny's natural history; a selection from Philemon Holland's translation.

Pliny's natural history in thirty-seven books: Plutarch's Romane questions: Regimen sanitatis Salernitanum. English. Regimen sanitatis Salerni, Rerum gestarum libri. Plutarch was born to a prominent family in the small town of Chaeronea, about 80 kilometres (50 mi) east of Delphi, in the Greek region of family was wealthy.

The name of Plutarch's father has not been preserved, but based on the common Greek custom of repeating a name in alternate generations, it was probably Nikarchus (Nίκαρχoς).Born: c.

AD 46, Chaeronea, Boeotia. Plutarch was the son of Aristobulus, himself a biographer and philosopher. In 66–67 Plutarch studied mathematics and philosophy at Athens under the philosopher Ammonius.

Public duties later took him several times to Rome, where he lectured on philosophy, made many friends, and perhaps enjoyed the acquaintance of the emperors Trajan and Hadrian. Philemon Holland (translator), The Philosophie, commonlie called, the Morals written by the Learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chæronea, London, The Opinions of the Philosophers, Book 3, Chap p.

— Plutarch (trans. by Philemon Holland), The Philosophie, Commonlie Called the Morals, Written by the Learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chaeronea, Of all our Martial Evils he's the worst, Who fain would write himself Man if he durst, His bulk, and needlesse magnitude hath shewn The symptomes of (what he's afraid to own).

Plutarch's Morals eBook: Plutarch: : Kindle Store. Skip to main content. Try Prime Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Sign in Account & Lists Returns & 5/5(1). Plutarch. An online book about this author is available, as is a Wikipedia article.

A Consolatorie letter or discourse sent by Plutarch of Chæronea unto his owne wife as touching the death of her and his daughter. The philosophie, commonlie called, the morals / (London: Printed by A.

Hatfield, ). The Philosophie Commonlie Called The Morals - Plutarch download M The Practice of Cookery, Pastry, Confectionary, Pickling download. Commonlie Called, the Morals, Written by the Learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chaeronea Plutarch The Philosophie A Road to Revolution: The Continuity of Puritanism, –Author: Debora Shuger.Fom Morals, translated by Philemon Holland, The Philosophie, Commonlie Called, the Moral Written by the Learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chæronea (), As cited in Harris Hawthorne Wilder, History of the Human Body (), The Philosophy Commonly Called, the Morals Written by the Learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chaeronea.

Translated Out of Greek Into English, and Conferred with the Latine Translations and the French, by Philemon Holland, Doctor of Physick.

Whereunto Are Annexed the Summaries Necessary to Be Read Before Every Treatise. Newly Revised and : N. Lewis.